The Lost Cause Rides Again

African Americans do not need science-fiction, or really any fiction, to tell them that this “history is still with us.”

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The problem of Confederate can’t be redeemed by production values, crisp writing, or even complicated characters. That is not because its conceivers are personally racist, or seek to create a show that endorses slavery. Far from it, I suspect. Indeed, the creators have said that their hope is to use science fiction to “show us how this history is still with us in a way no strictly realistic drama ever could.” And that really is the problem. African Americans do not need science-fiction, or really any fiction, to tell them that that “history is still with us.” It’s right outside our door. It’s in our politics. It’s on our networks. And Confederate is not immune. The show’s very operating premise, the fact that it roots itself in a long white tradition of imagining away emancipation, leaves one wondering how “lost” the Lost Cause really was.

Continue reading Ta-nehisi Coates’, “Don’t Give HBO’s ‘Confederate’ the Benefit of the Doubt,” here. You may also enjoy reading the “Klan Meets Regularly in Ypsilanti,” here